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1963 in film.

Discussion in 'Entertainment Forum' started by Morrissey, Apr 5, 2021.

  1. Morrissey

    Trusted

    Top ten box-office films of 1963:

    1. Cleopatra
    2. How the West Was Won
    3. It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World
    4. Tom Jones
    5. Irma la Douce
    6. Son of Flubber
    7. Charade
    8. Bye Bye Birdie
    9. Come Blow Your Horn and Move Over, Darling
    10. The Great Escape

    What are your top three films for 1963? We will keep a running tally and eventually have some sort of bracket. For me it would be:

    1. Contempt
    2. 8 1/2
    3. Winter Light

    What are some of the forgotten gems from the year? What is overrated? What did you discover at a young age and what did you discover later?

    YEARS IN FILM • forum.chorus.fm
     
  2. Nathan

    Always do the right thing. Supporter

    1. 8 1/2
    2. Contempt
    3. High and Low

    shouts out to Charade and the Big City
     
  3. username

    hey you lil piss baby

    1. Contempt
    2. The Insect Woman
    3. Dry Summer
     
  4. stars143

    Trusted Supporter

    1. The Pink Panther
    2. The Great Escape
    3. 8 1/2
     
    cshadows2887 likes this.
  5. Morrissey

    Trusted

    Contempt floored me in a way few other films ever have. It is Godard showing how well he could make a (mostly) conventional film, and that he was going to continue to branch out beyond the types of films the French New Wave were beginning to be known for.
     
  6. phaynes12

    playing in the band Supporter

    1. Cleopatra
    2. The Great Escape
    3. The Pink Panther
     
    cshadows2887 likes this.
  7. Matthewconte

    Regular Supporter

    1. Charade
    2. The Birds
    3. It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World
     
    cshadows2887 likes this.
  8. Victor Eremita

    Not here. Isn't happening. Supporter

    1. 8 1/2
    2. Contempt
    3. The Birds
    Pretty big gap between 2 and 3 but to this day I still get a little anxious when I see a flock of birds.
    This thread reminds me I need to see High and Low and Winter Light.
     
    Nathan likes this.
  9. Morrissey

    Trusted

    The Birds was my first Hitchcock so it has always played more in my imagination than others. The birds aren't quite as scary as sharks like in Jaws, but you can't trust them either.
     
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  10. phaynes12

    playing in the band Supporter

    you can never, under any circumstances, trust birds of any kind.
     
  11. OhTheWater

    Let it run Supporter

    please do not trust the birds
     
  12. Fronnyfron

    Turbo Olé Prestigious

    Birds are drones prove me wrong
     
  13. Marx&Recreation

    Trusted

    you can trust some birds, for example penguins
     
  14. Morrissey

    Trusted

  15. SpyKi

    I've been in love with her for ages Supporter

    1. Winter Light
    2. 8½
    3. High and Low
     
  16. George

    Trusted Prestigious

    1. High and Low
    2. The Birds
    3. Shock Corridor

    Missed the other threads, but this is a good idea!
     
    SpyKi likes this.
  17. George

    Trusted Prestigious

    Also from 1963 and well worth watching outside of the other brilliant films mentioned so far in this thread (it was a good year!), is a short film called Borom Sarret / The Wagoner by Ousmane Sembène, who directed Black Girl a few years later.

    It's somehow unbelievably the first film made by a black African, which feels kind of unreal that that didn't happen until 1963, about a poor wagoner ferrying people around, often for free, and the struggles he faces when crossing the divide between the rich and poor in Senegal. Sound design and conversations is all done in post production, and there's absolutely no attempt to sync to the visuals - so it's like an added layer of the narration.

    On Youtube, and 20 minutes long - so well worth finding the time;

     
    Victor Eremita, SpyKi and username like this.
  18. Morrissey

    Trusted

    I had not heard of this film but I have seen Moolaade, which is the last film he made. It was great and haunting.
     
  19. George

    Trusted Prestigious

    This and Black Girl are the only ones I've seen by him, but I thought they were both incredible, so have been meaning to watch more of his work, so I'll add Moolaade to the list! African cinema in general is a bit (a lot!) of a blind spot for me, so been looking to fill in some gaps recently.
     
  20. SpyKi

    I've been in love with her for ages Supporter

    I've only seen Moolaade too but it was great, I'll add both of those to my watchlist.
     
  21. Morrissey

    Trusted

    Coincidentally enough, I was teaching the Harlem Renaissance last week and I was trying to convey to my students the connection between how peoples' needs are being met and their ability to create art. Just like the Harlem Renaissance was possible because Black people were in a safer and more inviting environment, the same is true for Africa and the post-colonization opportunities that would exist that did not before. The canon is so heavily slanted toward the United States, Western Europe, and Japan because so many potentially great directors, actors, and writers never had a chance to express their ideas in many parts of the world.
     
    George likes this.
  22. username

    hey you lil piss baby

    Re: Sembene, his 1968 film Mandabi just recently got added to the Criterion Channel/released on disc. This was his first colour film and the stills I’ve seen from it are gorgeous. Haven’t watched the film myself yet, but I’ve been meaning to since the restoration came out. I should definitely try to get to it before the 1968 thread.

    His film Camp de Thiaroye is a really incredible work of Third Cinema. I had to watch it in my first or second year cinema studies core unit, which was such a gratifying experience because they hardly ever show us genuinely challenging works from outside of cinema’s main canon.
     
    George likes this.
  23. username

    hey you lil piss baby

    I’m no scholar in African cinema or anything, but Med Hondo is one of the major names you should explore. I worked on a paper about his film West Indies last year, which is honestly one of the best films I’ve ever seen. An ambitious Brechtian musical addressing 400 years of slavery and colonialism. It’s all set on a single recreated slave ship and doesn’t really play out in a directly linear sense, which affords it incredible space collapse the difference in time periods to mount its critique. Highly recommend seeking it out.
     
    SpyKi and George like this.
  24. George

    Trusted Prestigious

    Thank you for the recommendation , that sounds fascinating! I’ve never heard of him before, but will certainly mark that film down to check out.
     
    username likes this.
  25. Morrissey

    Trusted

    8 1/2 takes it with 11 votes. Contempt was very close with 10 votes. 8 1/2 will move on to the bracket.