Programming • Page 20

Discussion in 'Technology Forum' started by Dirty Sanchez, Mar 5, 2016.

  1. RyanPm40

    The best goddamn bird lawyer in the world. Supporter

    Do any of you guys ever work on apps with automated testing and think, "wow, I could have seriously fucked things up in the pre-unit testing days"? Lol. Junits and Protractor tests seriously save my life so many times.
     
    Dirty Sanchez likes this.
  2. mercury

    modern-day offspring fanatic Supporter

    hah, i tend to inherit projects that don't have unit tests at all... and most of my job-related anxiety is due to having no clue whether or not my builds break anything
     
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  3. RyanPm40

    The best goddamn bird lawyer in the world. Supporter

    Ahhh the worst. That was 100% me on an older team still using the waterfall methodology. What a nightmare, we were still using Java applets and forcing IE on folks. Now working on an agile team to replace it entirely and my stress level has gone down significantly lol.
     
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  4. Jacob

    Untrusted Prestigious

    I never do tests with iOS lol. Probably should for any manager classes but whatervs.
     
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  5. mercury

    modern-day offspring fanatic Supporter

    lmao a dev who got fired deleted my client's entire github organization last night, happy Monday!
     
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  6. drewinseries

    Drew @AndrewNCaruso fb/kingwildlands

    Say goodbye to references.
     
  7. RyanPm40

    The best goddamn bird lawyer in the world. Supporter

    Jesus Christ haha I don't even know what you would do from there
     
  8. RyanPm40

    The best goddamn bird lawyer in the world. Supporter

    Damnn, upgrading all of our UI dependencies and the newest Babel, Karma and Webpack are breaking things, gotta love it
     
    mercury likes this.
  9. mercury

    modern-day offspring fanatic Supporter

    Github restored the backups fairly quickly, but what an email to wake up to lol. Tbh i wouldn't be surprised if the person who deleted it (who was a massive moron) did it by accident.
     
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  10. RyanPm40

    The best goddamn bird lawyer in the world. Supporter

    Phew thank God they were able to resolve that for you, that'd be awful. I wonder the legalities of that if he really did delete it with bad intentions
     
  11. RyanPm40

    The best goddamn bird lawyer in the world. Supporter

    Man, I so wish that my team chose to write this app in Angular at the beginning. I joined on after the fact, but it would sure be lovely writing in a framework with wide support and documentation heh.

    I think it was because there was still a lot of questioning and unknowns about Angular 2 at the time and fear of it being completely replaced and in need of a massive rewrite eventually like how Angular and AngularJS are entirely different frameworks.
     
  12. cheese_pizza

    Newbie

    When I studied C++ I was sure the language is number one. But C# seems to be more suitable for me. JavaScript is the one I can't stand. Ruby is the language I'll study if only I have free time.
    PHP. Why does everyone laugh at PHP coders? Mystery of my life.
     
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  13. RyanPm40 Jan 17, 2019
    (Last edited: Jan 17, 2019)
    RyanPm40

    The best goddamn bird lawyer in the world. Supporter

    A good JavaScript or Typescript framework to develop a web app is so fun imo :). But trying to apply inline JS to a standard HTML site is definitely the worst.

    I liked C# a lot when I developed in it. Great language with Java-like syntax, it's just a bummer that it only allows for making windows software, if my memory is serving me right.

    PHP is fine, but it's just really outdated. We just use plain old Java springboot for the backend of our app at my job. Haven't really touched PHP since some intro courses in college, I did enjoy it at the time though
     
  14. RyanPm40

    The best goddamn bird lawyer in the world. Supporter

    Anyone work with Flutter and Dart before? Curious of others' opinions compared to other mobile development methods

    I've only ever made a Cordova app using a JavaScript framework in the past, so I've never written a native app that doesn't rely on a webview. Definitely new to writing a UI without HTML and CSS and from the Flutter tutorial, things look a bit messy with a lot of nesting in the widgets. My brain doesn't seem to wrap around Dart as easily as Java/JavaScript/HTML and not sure if writing native Java code for Android, or Swift code for iOS is any better
     
  15. Trick Room

    Trick Room!

    It's all about React (React.js/ReactJS/whatever) for me man. I'm completely bought in.

    We created our website with React, and it is so incredibly fluid and responsive, I love it.
    Everything updates real time, so no more waiting for the page to reload--you just select the element you want to update in the DOM and it re-renders instantly.

    The only caveat with React is that the DOM is rendered on the client, so it's not the best for SEO. Some search engine robots may not be able to execute the JavaScript bundle, so they'll only see a few lines of HTML. Yikes.

    But there's this awesome library called Next.js, which builds on top of React and allows the HTML to be rendered on the server via server-sided rendering (SSR). It's similar to how PHP works, but you get the responsiveness of React (which is freaking cool!). So when robots load your page, they'll be able to sift through the HTML and get the metadata they need. Each page gets their own rendered HTML, so you can have unique meta tags for each page.

    There's a bit of learning curve, but once you get the hang of it, you won't use anything else! Well, that's my two cents :)
     
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  16. christsizedshoes

    Regular

    Generic and fairly naive question for the professional devs/software engineers on here:

    Thinking about the industry and job market as a whole in the U.S., how would you assess working conditions/expectations/hours relative to pay? Also, more specifically, how rare is it to find a steady and decent-paying dev job that allows a lot of flexibility in hours, working remotely somewhat regularly, etc.? Is that type of gig a dime a dozen, or do old school norms around 9-5, daily stand-up meetings, etc. still dominate? Obviously, this is probably dependent at least partially on location and the type of employer (public vs. private, large vs. small company, software shop vs. devs within a broader org), so any of those details would also be great.