Concert ‘Merch’ Comes of Age

Discussion in 'Article Discussion' started by Melody Bot, Apr 19, 2016.

  1. Melody Bot

    Your friendly little forum bot. Staff Member

    This article has been imported from chorus.fm for discussion. All of the forum rules still apply.

    Robert Cordero, writing for the Business of Fashion, on how concert tour merchandise is becoming not just a way for artists to make money, but also a player in the fashion world:


    “Obviously, the sales [of concert ‘merch’] are big and significant,” says Jerry Lorenzo, the Los Angeles-based founder and designer of Fear of God, who worked closely with Welch to create some of Justin’s Bieber’s looks for his current tour. “But they’re just as important as a branding asset to an artist,” he continues. “It’s the new CD. It’s as important as the sound, a part of the vision.”

     
  2. Peachfuzz

    I'll be with you the whole way.

    Interesting. Still, so many bands I love sell t-shirts I would never wear..!
     
  3. suicidesaints

    Trusted Prestigious

    Thank you Yeezus
     
  4. Cola.

    I was such a looker in the old days Prestigious

    Haha I have so many band shirts and yet I think I wear like three in rotation
     
    cybele likes this.
  5. jorbjorb

    Conditioner is better.

    yeah. I stopped wearing band merch a long time ago. They look really bad.
     
  6. DearCory

    Regular

    It's also interesting that its creating a secondary market for merch. Example:

    The "I feel like Pablo" shirts, are Gildan brand, and have a common font on them.

    Kanye sells them for $45 (t-shirt) and $65 (long sleeve t-shirt)

    Go on Etsy, eBay, or Amazon and get an EXACT replica, shipped to you for under $20.

    I know there's always been knockoffs... but now the internet is doing a really good job of replicating the originals, to a T.
     
  7. zachff

    deadformat.net/collection/zachff Prestigious

    This is getting kind of meta but there was a kid in NY who went to the TLOP pop-up shop, bought a few items, bootlegged them, then sold them back to people waiting in line the next day.
    Article here: How a 17-year-old got his fake Yeezy merch Kanye-approved